Review: Easiyo Yogurt Maker

Easiyo Yogurt Maker

We consume quite a lot of yoghurt and since Eva started solids, one of the first foods I wanted to introduce to her was yoghurt as Nil and I just simply loveeeee yoghurt to bits, not to mention he wants to be absolutely sure that she grows up exposed to a wide variety of both European and Asian foods/items. The only problem with us loving yoghurt is that it can really put a dent in our pockets. A one kilo tub of good quality creamy yoghurt can hit up to nearly $10 so I started exploring the option of making homemade yoghurt.

I came across the Easiyo Yogurt Maker and decided that it was good value for money as it was simple to use (just three steps), the gadget itself looked simple – nothing fancy like stainless steel drums and so forth – and have starters/cultures available as well. Phoon Huat here in Singapore sells these for $35 and the cultures for $6. I was lucky to have stumbled upon them while they were having a promotion – buy a yoghurt maker and get five culture packs of the same value for free. So I grabbed a pack of Natural, Custard, Mango and two packs of Skimmers (low fat) cultures. All the culture packs include milk solids and live cultures already so all you need to do is just add water. Best part is that each pack makes 1 kg of yoghurt.

The instructions are easy – wash and dry the yoghurt maker (where you’ll be culturing your yoghurt) before use and wipe the yoghurt jar with a damp cloth. In the yoghurt maker, pour in the cultures and add in about 500ml of cool water (refrigerated water is good) before stirring rapidly and well (if you want creamier yoghurt). Once the cultures have dissolved, fill it up to the 1 liter mark and close the maker. Fill the jar with boiling water until the indication point (there is a mechanism inside) and place the maker inside before closing the jar. Put aside for at least 10-12 hours – you can leave it to culture for up to 24 hours and the result will be firm but tangy yoghurt. The shorter it has been culturing, the less firmer and less tangy the yoghurt will be. I like my yoghurt creamy and slightly firm as well as tangy so I let it sit for 12 hours.

After this, you can remove the maker and refrigerate the yoghurt maker but what I did was stir up the yoghurt before refrigeration to help mix the whey (liquid from the culturing process which is high in Vit B and so forth) and yoghurt. The result is as seen in the pic below – slightly liquidy and not quite set. I left the mix to set in the fridge overnight and the result was firm but creamy and yummy yoghurt.

At first, Nil was a bit sceptical about using culture packs but when he tasted the yoghurt after culturing and then again after setting, he was sold on it! His verdict? Yummy! Best part of all is that you don’t need culture packs to make yoghurt. All you need is milk and more yoghurt which I’ll tell one of these days as what yoghurt you use (as a starter) has an impact on the taste as well as the type of milk you use.

Oh, did I mention that Eva loves it as well? 😀

Natural Easiyo Yogurt

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15 Comments

  1. uhm, silly question …how long does Ikg of yoghurt keep (fresh – still have live lactic cultures) in the fridge?

    Mabel Reply:

    It can keep up to two weeks just like commercial yoghurt but in our case, it doesn’t go for more than a week coz Nil takes it for breakfast every morning and me for dessert at night sometimes. 🙂

  2. hehe… You just converted me! I just came back from the mall with the Easiyo maker, jar and 4 packs of cultures (organic, strawberry, raspberry and wildberries) all packed in a straw basket at the cost of RM102.
    Please do share later, how you do it without the culture packs!

    Mabel Reply:

    LOL…have you tried it out yet? Our first batch is nearly finished so will finish off the sachets before I make my own from scratch. 🙂

  3. This is the best! We purchased ours a couple of years ago after a huge chunk of our weekly grocery budget was being spent on yoghurt! I use milk and about 1 tbsp of the easiyo flavoured culture and it turns out beautifully…like soft serve ice cream…if you like thicker consistency, just add a couple of tbsp of powder milk into your fresh milk before adding the easiyo culture and it turns out like tau foo fah!

    Mabel Reply:

    Oooo…good ideas! So far, Eva likes the yogurt cultures – in fact, the thicker it is, the better; never mind the tang! 😛 Me? I love greek style, ultra thick – yummmmyyyyyy!

  4. when i went to phoon huat i saw the easiyo yogurt satchet and bought it. only when i reached, i realised that i need to use it with the maker. now that i’ve bought the maker, i was wondering if i can make my own yogurt from scratch and by using the maker. have you tried before?

    Mabel Reply:

    I haven’t but my friend has – the recipe and instructions are over on her blog here.

  5. I have the Easiyo and I could like to know exactly how to make my own yogurt without using their sachets. I read few thread but its not very clear to me. If I use UHT milk do I have to heat it up or no? how should I do to make my own using the easiyo heater.
    thank you

  6. Hey mabel, thx for sharing my yogurt method 🙂

    florona, i think UHT milk might not work, u need to get fresh milk (pasteurised), heat it up

  7. hi, i had bought easiyo yogurt maker and i try to do it but c’nt get the perfect yogurt , is it the

    yogurt must leave inside maker for over 12 hours? thank you.

    Mabel Reply:

    I believe there is a minimum no of hours for the yogurt to set (10-12 hrs) otherwise it won’t give you the right texture/taste.

  8. Hi Mabel,

    I been making yogurt using easi yo for few months, it taste great for the first 2-3 times. but there onwards yogurt turns out rather sour and lumpy no matter how clean i wash the maker, even use food safe sanitizer to clean but it still turns out nasty 🙁 Any idea why?

    Thanks, Gin

    Mabel Reply:

    I never had this problem before – use regular water, sponge and soap to gently wash the insides before letting it airdry and then making sure it’s stored when it’s completely dried. Could it be that you scratched the surface of the container and thus it has bacteria residing in it? :S

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